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Transatlantic commercial networks and the palimpsest of Greek migration in America during the 19th c.

Transatlantic commercial networks and the palimpsest of Greek migration in America during the 19th c.

On Wednesday, 13/11/2019, at 18:30, in the Multimedia room of the Department of History, Archaeology and Social Anthropology, on the 6th floor.

Summary
The core of the historical narrative of the Greek diaspora in the New World centers around the bulk of the Greek migratory flows to America, which emerged in the early 20th century, casting in the historical margins several Greeks, who sometimes in small communities or individually seem to exploit the transatlantic trade networks and prosper throughout the 19th century. The present lecture discusses and attempts to map this early history of the Greek Diaspora in America and proposes an evolutionary narrative model to interpret the gradual coexistence of the 19th century Greek Diaspora with the first immigrants of the 20th century. This is mainly achieved by the emblematic personality and effective contribution of a leading figure in each of these first Greek communities of the New World, the 'Homo Auctor'.